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Notice the name Neuwelt. Watch for in Video

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howardjoel   Tuesday, 08/24/04 07:42:30 AM
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Notice the name Neuwelt. Watch for in Video posted next.

Public release date: 26-May-2004
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Contact: Jonathan Modie
modiej@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Nanoparticles illuminate brain tumors for days under MRI
OHSU study finds tiny crystals also help brain lesion tissue to be viewed under microscope
PORTLAND, Ore. - A research team from Oregon Health & Science University and the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center is demonstrating some of the world's first clinical applications for nanometer-size particles in the brain.
The OHSU scientists have shown that an iron oxide nanoparticle as small as a virus can outline not only brain tumors under magnetic resonance imaging, but also other lesions in the brain that may otherwise have gone unnoticed, according to a study published in the journal Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology.

So named because of its billionth-of-a-meter proportions, the iron oxide nanoparticle, ferumoxtran-10, can be viewed as a contrast agent under MR for more than 24 hours, sometimes as long as five days, said the study's lead author, Edward Neuwelt, M.D., professor of neurology and neurological surgery, OHSU School of Medicine, and the Portland VA Medical Center.

In a parallel study by Neuwelt and colleagues, to be presented in June to the American Society of Neuroradiology, ferumoxtran-10 also was found to provide a "stable imaging marker" during surgery to remove brain tumors, and it remains in the brain long enough for post-operative MR, even after surgical manipulation.

The studies' findings have the potential to assist image-guided brain surgery and improve diagnosis of lesions caused by multiple sclerosis, stroke and other neurological disorders, in addition to residual tumors.

"This is one of the first biologically specific nanoparticles to be used in clinical trials," said Neuwelt, director of OHSU's Blood-Brain Barrier Program, which studies ways of outwitting the brain's natural defense to treat people with brain tumors. "This is the first time it's been applied to look at inflammatory lesions in the brain, not just tumors. They're very interesting particles and they're safe."

Study co-author Gary Nesbit, M.D., associate professor of diagnostic radiology and neurological surgery, and the Dotter Interventional Institute, OHSU, agreed the nanoparticles show potential for providing insight into a variety of brain pathologies.

"We're learning that disease in the brain is a complex system that has active involvement with cells and membranes, so there's a lot of interest in other areas as well," Nesbit said.

He said this early research on ferumoxtran-10 must be expanded to a larger group of patients to help scientists learn more about how the material reaches certain tumors and lesions, and why.

"This contrast agent provides a completely different way of looking at enhancement patterns on MRI," Nesbit added. There are distinct differences in how tumors enhance with contrast agents. "The way the contrast agent gets there is completely different. What we need to find out is what the specific pattern of enhancement with this contrast agent means."







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