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It's one of those stories where you get

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jurisper Member Level  Sunday, 05/13/12 12:23:33 AM
Re: janice shell post# 12113
Post # of 17705 
It's one of those stories where you get frustrated that the regional press doesn't do more with it.

The judge in the O'Riordan trial was US district court chief Michael Wolf. I am a simpering fanboi of Wolf's from his excellent judgeship in the Whitey Bulger FBI cover-up. He basically ripped the lid off the cover-up and from the bench lashed the FBI for its appalling behavior.

A major early FBI Whitey Bulger cover-upper was the then-SAC Boston Jim Ahearn, who came in for his share of Wolf-lashing at the time.

Years later, Ahearn turns up out of the blue as a director of Locateplus. At the time the criminal investigation of the LP insiders has commenced. Reasonable guess that he was brought in to help "manage" the situation by an old buddy who was himself an LP shareholder and ex-director.

Ahearn then evidently takes a leading role in recruiting Ken Kaiser, another ex-SAC Boston, away from his job heading up the FBI criminal investigation division nationally, to work as "Chief Risk Officer" at LP. Kaiser immediately (and quite probably illegally) starts meeting with FBI agents and DoJ people on the LP case, evidently trying to steer them into investigating Dutchess in one instance (an LP "investor", aligned somehow with the ex-CFO).

In the emails relating to all this filed in court pleadings, a major role alongside Ahearn is evidently taken by by a long-time associate of Chalmers from their days at bucket-shop Oftring, LP's former underwriter, one Thomas E. Murphy. He is a former LP director and former chair of its audit committee. Both Chalmers and Murphy are shown as playing major roles in obstructing the former LP auditors from getting at the truth in the SEC admin action against the auditors.

A year or so after Kaiser's hiring, O'Riordan works his plea agreement with AUSA Wild, board colleague of Chalmers on another pennyscam deal. I have never seen a softer approach from a prosecutor than Wild's testimony in the O'Riordan sentencing hearing transcript. O'Riordan gets painted as borderline-retarded, a nice boy running in bad company, a star informant against others etc etc. He dumps everything on the ex-CEO/ex-CFO; nothing on the other insiders.

Wolf buys the painting and gives O'Riordan 6 months. None of the FBI-related or other insider stuff is brought to his attention in this case, as far as I can see.

As a Wolf fanboi, I'm offended by the possibility that he might have been hoodwinked by the old FBI and DoJ meatheads (& their spiritual successors) that he had lambasted so tellingly back in the day.

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