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LVTruthSeeker   Saturday, 01/16/10 07:42:41 AM
Re: None
Post # of 3150 
They say a man can be judged by the company that he keeps, I am wondering why the CEO Roger Mohlman was involved with Beverlee Kamerling aka Beverly Clayton, especially considering the fact that Mr. Mohlman always says how concerned he is on protecting his investors, but as we know ACTIONS speak much louder than words (please judge for yourself):

insert-text-here
Re: Beverlee Claydon Kamerling
By: anniebonny in FAKE
Wed, 19 Nov 08 3:26 PM
Msg. 13420 of 22673
(This msg. is a reply to 13416 by sygrid jones)

Global Fine Wine & Spirits, Inc. to Acquire SIPP, Inc
Business Wire, June 3, 2008 LAS VEGAS -- The following letter was issued today to the shareholders of SIPP, Inc.:

To the Valued Shareholders of SIPP, Inc. (a private company),

As previously announced, SIPP, Inc. (a privately held Nevada corporation) formally rescinded as of May 1, 2008 the share exchange with SIPP Industries, Inc. (aka Promax), as announced on May 14, 2008. The reason for the rescission was that various problems involving the shell corporation (Promax-SIPP Industries, Inc.) and the company's registration had come to light and contrary to what has been said, SIPP, Inc. has always been a legitimate business with real and innovative products, distribution and marketing. We are truly sorry for any inconvenience that the Promax incident has caused. SIPP, Inc.'s decisions are always guided by the goal of protecting you, our shareholders.

To further clarify SIPP, Inc.'s concerns: the point person of the legal team that brought SIPP, Inc. the Promax shell, Beverlee Kamerling, is currently awaiting trial in Washington state on federal criminal charges (insert-text-here). According to the government's press release, Kamerling was one of eight defendants charged on a 21 count indictment, with one or more of the following crimes: Conspiracy to Commit Securities Fraud and Mail Fraud, Securities Fraud, Mail Fraud, International Money Laundering, Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice, Falsify Documents, and Make False Statements, Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice and Commit Perjury, Obstruction of Justice, Perjury, Criminal Contempt, and Failure to File Federal Income Tax Returns. She is alleged to be one of the leaders of the scheme. In 1999, KAMERLING was permanently barred by court order from serving as an officer or director of a public company, and was permanently barred from violating the federal securities laws. In 2000, KAMERLING was ordered to pay nearly $1.5 million in ill gotten gains from a previous stock fraud scheme. According to the indictment, she and her co-conspirators hid their involvement in the current stock fraud scheme by installing her mother, son, and boyfriend as officers of the various companies she and her co-conspirators acquired. In 2004 and 2005, KAMERLING failed to file an income tax return on as much as $250,000 and $600,000, respectively, in income, including funds she obtained as part of the scheme is currently awaiting trial in Washington state on federal criminal charges. SIPP Inc. offers no opinion on Beverly Kamerling's (or "Beverly Clayton" as she was represented to us) guilt or innocence. When it became known to SIPP, Inc. that Ms. Kamerling's company had substantial free trading shares of SIPP Industries, Inc. stock, SIPP, Inc. did not feel under the circumstances, that we could responsibly go forward with the share exchange into the Promax/Sipp Industries shell. It is the legal opinion of SIPP, Inc.'s counsel that the registration of the shell was not done in accordance with SEC regulations and SIPP, Inc. had no choice but to cancel the deal.

To protect the interest of its shareholders, SIPP, Inc. has arranged for an acquisition with a clean spin-off that is going through the registration process. The company is Global Fine Wine and Spirits, Inc. The audit has been paid for and completed and the 15c211 filing has been submitted. Two weeks after the corporation is trading it will acquire SIPP, Inc. The company will obtain a legal opinion on when SIPP, Inc. shareholders shares will be eligible to trade.

As soon as the government approves the 15c211 filing on Global Fine Wine and Spirits, Inc. and the acquisition of SIPP, Inc. is completed, new shares will be issued to all SIPP, Inc. shareholders. We anticipate the filings will take approximately 4-6 weeks.

COPYRIGHT 2008 Business Wire
COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning


----------------------
December 5, 2007

NINE CHARGED IN “PUMP AND DUMP” SECURITIES FRAUD SCHEME
Defendants Conspired to Obstruct a Grand Jury and FBI Investigation
Eight people were indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury in Seattle, Washington for a variety of charges related to a “pump and dump” securities fraud scheme. As part of the scheme, the defendants secretly acquired publicly traded companies, sent out “junk faxes” and press releases, and sold stock through nominee brokerage accounts in the U.S., Canada, and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The public companies involved were all Washington corporations: America Asia Energy Corporation, Coattec Industries, Inc., Detex Security Systems, Inc., and Global Gaming Network, Inc. The indictment calls for the forfeiture of some $1.2 million illegally derived from the scheme. A ninth defendant, a Bellevue lawyer, had already pleaded guilty to his role in the scheme.

The twenty-one count indictment charges each of the eight defendants with one or more of the following crimes: Conspiracy to Commit Securities Fraud and Mail Fraud, Securities Fraud, Mail Fraud, International Money Laundering, Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice, Falsify Documents, and Make False Statements, Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice and Commit Perjury, Obstruction of Justice, Perjury, Criminal Contempt, and Failure to File Federal Income Tax Returns. Two of the defendants, BEVERLEE P. KAMERLING and NICHOLAS J. ALEXANDER, were arrested this morning in the Western District of Washington and will make their initial appearances in federal court at 2:30 today.

BEVERLEE P. KAMERLING, 63, of Bellevue, Washington was one of the leaders of the scheme. In 1999, KAMERLING was permanently barred by court order from serving as an officer or director of a public company, and was permanently barred from violating the federal securities laws. In 2000, KAMERLING was ordered to pay nearly $1.5 million in ill gotten gains from a previous stock fraud scheme. According to the indictment, she and her co-conspirators hid their involvement in the stock fraud scheme by installing her mother, son, and boyfriend as officers of the various companies she and her co-conspirators acquired. In 2004 and 2005, KAMERLING failed to file an income tax return on as much as $250,000 and $600,000, respectively, in income, including funds she obtained as part of the scheme.

KAMERLING’s son, NICHOLAS J. ALEXANDER, 22, is also charged in the indictment. As alleged in the indictment, ALEXANDER served as an officer and director of all of the public companies named in the indictment, and shredded documents in Boca Raton, Florida after he learned about the existence of a grand jury subpoena. ALEXANDER later arranged for prepaid cell phones to be used to avoid detection by the FBI.

As alleged in the indictment, other conspirators who played roles in the scheme also concealed their involvement in the companies from the investing public, as well as their prior SEC actions and criminal convictions. JOEL RAMSDEN, 32, of Delray Beach, Florida, had a pending SEC enforcement action against him, JOHN E. JOHANSEN, 37, of Plantation, Florida, had a conviction for conspiracy to commit credit card fraud, and JOHN E. WORTHEN, 66, of Salt Lake City, Utah, had a prior SEC injunction, a conviction for criminal contempt of the injunction, and a conviction for attempted income tax evasion.

KAMERLING, ALEXANDER, RAMSDEN, JOHANSEN and WORTHEN are all charged with Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice, Falsify Documents and Make False Statements due to their efforts to obstruct the grand jury investigation and the FBI investigation of their securities fraud scheme. Three additional defendants also based in Florida, DONALD I. GOLDSTEIN, 65, of Highlands Beach, Florida, his son, JAMIE S. GOLDSTEIN, 35, of Boca Raton, Florida, and SETH QUINTO, 36, of Miami, Florida, were charged with Conspiracy to Obstruct Justice and Commit Perjury in connection with false statements they made to the grand jury in Seattle that was investigating the scheme.

In addition to the eight indicted, Bellevue attorney Tolan S. Furusho pled guilty last week to Conspiracy to Commit Securities Fraud for his role in the scheme, and to two counts of Failure to File Federal Income Tax Returns.

The case was investigated by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS), the Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI), the FBI, and the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI).

Michael Stevenson, Director of the Department of Financial Institution’s Securities Division, stated: “DFI is dedicated to preserving the integrity of the marketplace for all those who buy and sell stocks.”

Ronald Verrochio, Inspector in Charge of the Postal Inspection Service in Seattle, stated: “In fraudulent schemes like these there is still a need to transmit monetary instruments, like stock certificates, through the U. S. Mail and commercial carriers. It is our mission as United States Postal Inspectors to protect the Postal Service, our customers, and the American public from this type of abuse. This case is indicative of our strong commitment to that mission.”

The U.S. Attorney’s Office wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Integrated Market Enforcement Team (IMET) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Criminal Prosecution Assistance Group.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Jim Lord, and Special Assistant United States Attorney Robert Kondrat. Mr. Kondrat is an attorney with the Washington State Department of Financial Institutions, specially designated to handle securities fraud cases in federal court.

The charges contained in the indictment are only allegations. A person is presumed innocent unless and until he or she is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. If convicted, the defendants each face a sentence of up to twenty years of incarceration and up to $5,000,000 in fines on the most serious charges, including Securities Fraud and Mail Fraud.

For additional information please contact Emily Langlie, Public Affairs Officer for the United States Attorney’s Office, at (206) 553-4110.

Now Paul Harvey's rest of the story:

insert-text-here

Bellevue stock swindler gets 7½ years

A federal judge Friday sentenced a Bellevue woman to 7½ years in prison for helping to orchestrate a massive stock-fraud scheme that bilked more than 3,000 investors in all 50 states out of nearly $2.5 million. U.S. District Judge Richard Jones told 65-year-old Beverlee Kamerling that she had failed to show a "shred of acceptance of responsibility" for the huge swindle.

By Ian Ith

Seattle Times staff reporter

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A federal judge Friday sentenced a Bellevue woman to 7-½ years in prison for helping to orchestrate a massive stock-fraud scheme that bilked more than 3,000 investors in all 50 states out of nearly $2.5 million.

U.S. District Judge Richard Jones told 65-year-old Beverlee Kamerling that she had failed to show a "shred of acceptance of responsibility" for the huge swindle. He ordered her to repay the money and undergo mental-health treatment.

"If you were in the business of magic, perhaps your skills of deception would be an asset," Jones said. "But you don't get it. You exhibit total contempt for our system of laws and ethics."

Kamerling was indicted by a grand jury in late 2007 along with about eight others, including her son. Federal investigators at the time alleged that Kamerling was the leader behind the "pump-and-dump" scheme to buy up worthless companies, artificially inflate their stock values through false advertising and promotion, then dump shares using offshore brokerages.

Kamerling had a long history of securities violations both in the U.S. and in Canada, where she was banned from the markets in 1989. In 1999, a federal judge barred Kamerling from U.S. markets as well.

Prosecutors sought a 10-year sentence for Kamerling, the maximum under the law. Though they have since backed off contentions that she was the sole mastermind of the operation, they maintained Friday that she had a hand in virtually every aspect of the scheme. And they pointed to her history of stock-market trouble and unwillingness to accept fault.

While she pleaded guilty to securities fraud and obstruction of justice, Kamerling later sent the judge packets of letters totaling at least 100 pages in which she denied wrongdoing and contended no one was hurt because of her. She accused the government of a decades-long campaign to harass her.

"Ms. Kamerling clearly feels she's above the law," Assistant U.S. Attorney James Lord said. "She knows no boundaries."

But Kamerling's lawyer, Peter Avenia, argued that Kamerling was "demonized" as the boss but was actually only the "hired help" for the real kingpins, Florida men Avenia called "the big three" — John Johansen and brothers Joel and Frazier Ramsden.

Frazier Ramsden is serving a 41-month sentence, and his brother got a six-year sentence last month. Johansen is still awaiting sentencing.

Another co-conspirator, former Bellevue securities attorney Tolan Furusho, was sentenced to 13 months in prison last month and has been disbarred. Kamerling's son, Nicholas Alexander, was sentenced to 41 months.

Kamerling read from a prepared statement that also deflected all blame.

She likened her involvement to merely selling a car that later crashes and hurts someone. And she suggested that someone should make a Web site that lists warning signs of fraudulent stock deals.

Jones replied that if there were such a list, Kamerling's behavior would meet every criteria. "While I don't believe you were the kingpin," Jones said, "you served as the adhesive for a house built on ill-gotten gains."

Ian Ith: 206-464-2109 or iith@seattletimes.com

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One would have to admit that PSGI/Roger Mohlman share many similarities with Beverlee Kamerling's now very well documented illegal schemes. I would encourage any investors that feel this to be a true statement to contact the SEC as soon as possible. Mr. Hohlman/PSGI have shown & continue to show signs of SEC fraud - hidden or no product, stock manipulation, multiple lawsuits, a convenient divorce possibly used to hide assets - ill-gotten investors money. Scammers tend to flock together, just like multi-level marketers and their pyramid schemes. Criminals work together because that is the only way that they can survive. If any of my words ring true to you, please pick up the phone or send an email to the SEC or law enforcement requesting that they investigate PSGI, Roger Mohlman, Donna Mohlman and all of their accomplices, who by the way are just as guilty as the kingpins. Folks, the evidence of wrongdoing is in plain sight...unlike the company's products which seem to be more difficult to find than the proverbial "needle in a haystack." And what about the highly touted contracts?...something is seriously wrong here and it is pointing right at Roger Mohlman the famous "San Diego Granite Man."

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